Different challenge

Two drawings prompted by a friend who is interested in more abstract work. The first is a repeated line drawing of carrier bags using two pens held together. Then I wrote over the top, plastic carrier bags, too much plastic in the world. The second is meant to represent folded paper. I could also have tried using masking tape but I don’t have any. So I drew on limited colours and varied the thickness and weight of the lines. Digital drawing.

Doodles

I think I was trying to do abstract faces with lines here. Somehow the doodles at the bottom of the picture seem to fit with the contours above. I don’t remember the canvas so I probably painted over it. Sometimes what you paint is not what you want and you have to scrap it. Sometimes you fool yourself into thinking somethings OK when it really isn’t. I like some things and they just won’t work…. I may try and alter this in a digital app? Don’t know. I think this image is about three or four years old….

Vanishing point exercise

If you are learning to draw have you tried drawing vanishing points yet? If you draw a horizontal line along the middle of a piece of A4 paper you can work out how to do three dimensional objects. Draw a dot somewhere along that line. Use a ruler and draw lines radiating from it. Then draw vertical lines up or down to them. Instant buildings in perspective. You can even use more than one vanishing point. For curved objects like a can or a glass it gives you a clue on how to draw curves and what direction they will be in. Generally upwards if you are looking from below the rim of a can and downwards if from above. It all depends on your eye level. The horizontal line in this exercise represents that. But it’s your choice. The line can be higher or lower (think of the view for a child, closer to the ground, or someone at the top of a bus!)

I used to also have fun drawing boxes with this, or alien buildings, or anything, I tried it with a horse once! You can use soft pencil to draw in the lines so you can erase them later, or use to mark out an object before you start a painting. It helps you sort out all types of things, including portraits or figures. Just play about with it.
I only suggested A4 as that gives you plenty of room…. You can use any size or type of paper.

Pattern

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I drew this a few weeks ago. Now I’m thinking it would make a good design for some cotton material, maybe a panel on a tee shirt or a pair of trousers. I actually have a pair in black and white that is similar to this. It’s amazing what you can do with a black ink pen and a bit of technology. I just need to find someone to work with.

If you know any innovative art sites that do printing let me know. I did think about joining somewhere called spoonflower but I wasn’t certain about it.

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Liverpool metropolitan cathedral.

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A sketch of the inside of the Liverpool metropolitan cathedral. This is the Catholic one. There is also an Anglican one. This was our Saturday ‘sketch out’ with urban sketchers Stoke-on-Trent.

We did this on Zoom again, although I couldn’t remember how to log on. So although I could see people talking and hear them I could not interact. I decided to sketch it quickly as I was late to the conversation. I tried using blocks of strong colour. The lighting in the cathedral is bright and colourful. This image was taken off Google maps as we are not allowed to visit these places yet.

Pattern

Draw some lines in black and brown, erase some lines and then duplicate the pattern you have created. What does it mean? Could they be power lines? A knitting patten, crochet? A surreal or abstract spiders web?

Whatever it is, is open to interpretation. If the pattern is moved one way or another you may see an animal or a design for a electricity pylon. The mind tries to interpret what it sees, but sometimes there is not enough information to discern what is happening or how it affects us. As complex as this is its very simple compared to a real person.