New ideas for paintings

They might not look like much yet, but I’ve just blocked in three small painting that I sketched out over the weekend. The middle one is of a cat curled up on an armchair. The chair will be covered in a holly pattern.the cat on the window ledge will have a blue and white vase next to it, and the pottery is an imagined view in the snow,

I’ve got a busy week so I might not be able to get online much. Also I’ve got toothache!

New tablet

15716773727161289863068617477063

This isn’t the tablet but a drawing of the screen. I installed lots of software today. What a mess! I have different passwords for each app. It confused me! Had to reset some. I wanted to do lots of stuff today but I’ve spent four hours just learning how to use it.

Anyway the photo is for day 21 of the 1″ inch challenge for October.

X

Drawing, squaring up

When you are learning to draw you can use a grid to help. If you are trying to copy an image you can draw a grid over the original, then draw the same sized squares on the paper you are drawing on. Finally copy the original onto the drawing by filling in each square. The grid helps you place lines more accurately. If you do the drawing in pen instead you can rub out the pencil lines. It’s really only a device to help learning to draw, or if you want to draw out the basis for a painting when you are using opaque paints like gouache, acrylics or oils. You can also use this for scaling up or down. If the squares are half size on the original the drawing will be twice the size (or vice versa), hope this makes sense.

X

Green skies

IMG_20191016_182532_487 (2) (2)_optimized

The Aurora borealis is something I’ve never seen but always wanted to. When I see photos of it I’m amazed that electrons from the suns solar wind can cause such beauty.

The electrons and other particles travel along the magnetic lines of force at the North Pole (and South – the Aurora Australis I think it’s called). As they interact with the magnetic field they glow. The different colours denote different elements. I think Green is Nitrogen and Pink is Oxygen.

The Aurora occur at the poles because they are where the magnetic field is at its weakest and drops down towards the pole. If you have seen iron filings round a bar magnet you can see how the field curves round and down.

So what is solar wind? It is the matter that pours out from the sun when there is a hole in the corona (upper atmosphere of the sun). There are coronal mass ejections where the sun spews out masses of ionised electrons which interact with Earth’s atmosphere.

There is a lot more about aurora’s but my knowledge is not good enough to explain more.

 

Daylight Saving Time

I was thinking about writing about Daylight saving time but this blog saves me having to research it. Very interesting.

Explaining Science

As mentioned in my previous post, in the early hours of Sunday 27 October the clocks go back an hour throughout the European Union and daylight saving time comes to an end.

Although many Europeans will welcome the extra hour in bed on the night of 26/27 October, I suspect that a lot of people won’t like the darker evenings. In this post I’ll talk about daylight saving time (DST) : the practice of advancing the clock by an hour during the spring and summer months and why this is coming to an end in many countries.

The advent of DST

The first place in the world to practise DST was the town of Port Arthur, Ontario. In 1908, a local businessman, John Hewitson petitioned the town council to adjust the clocks one hour forward in the summer months so the locals could enjoy an extra hour of summer sun…

View original post 1,285 more words

Ideas for paintings

Sketching designs for winter paintings that can still be good to have on the walls all year round. I’ve seen a painting with a pottery in the snow, so I’m going to do something similar with Holly and Ivy. The second idea is a cat on a windowledge with a blue and white vase next to it.

Will try and get them painted this week.

The Orionids

sketch-1571599407817

Coming up on 22nd October 2019 is the Orionid meteor shower. There have already been a few fireballs from the shower and they are due to peak at dawn on the 22nd so it might be worth setting an alarm.

Where do they come from? They are dusty remnants of the comet Halley. They are the dust cloud that came off the comet as it travelled through the solar system. Halley returns on a regular basis. It was identified as a recurring comet by the astronomer Edmund Halley when he realised it was the same comet that had been seen in the sky around the time of the battle of Hastings and then approximately every 100 years or so afterwards.

The meteors (or meteorites if they land) appear to radiate from the area around the star Orion which is why they are called the Orionids. There are other showers of meteors throughout the year. These include the Persids and the Geminids. Some showers are brighter than others. It depends on the debris cloud that the Earth moves through. The dust and debris for showers are in patches of space that the Earth moves through, hence their yearly appearance.

The Orionids apparently move faster than a lot of other meteors so they can create more of a show. The speed increases the friction and they burn up in the atmosphere faster.

You can find out more at a website called Spaceweather.com