Twig owl

A process of cropping, mirroring and flipping images to create interesting patterns. I think the final result looks like a little owl reflected in water. I’ve changed the tones and hues slightly in the image to enhance the shadows in the cloudscape. The idea has always been to have abstract shapes apparently floating in the sky. It’s a recurring theme of mine.

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Helibores are flowering

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Helibores are flowering,

Snowdrops soon will bloom,

Then will follow crocuses

With the light of the moon.

Daffodils and Tulips, all in a row, 

Then come the wind flowers,

Wood anemone,

Finally in sunshine

Bluebells, for to see….

Spring will alive

With flowers for you and me.

 

Slugs must have some use?

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You know how it is..

You go into the garden

When it rains

And there are slugs.

What are they for?

They munch your broccoli,

Eat the hearts of your lettuce,

Nip the buds off peonies,

And eat your ripe tomatoes.

But they also eat old and diseased vegetables.

They help clear up leaves

In the autumn,

And they are food for blackbirds and frogs.

So not all bad then…?

Morning cat.

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About 7.50 this morning. The cat was on the window ledge looking out over the garden. Standing sentinel. Approving the occupants of the green place outside. Birds fly or scurry across the land, feeding on wild bird seed. Other cats stalk through the plants and drink the pond water. None miss my cats gaze. He also seems to protect us. Standing guard against interlopers. I feel secure seeing him sitting statue like. Patient, watching over us.

Holly

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Variegated Holly, a view of winter plants. When desiduous leaves have fallen, Ivy and Holly add green to the garden. We have three Holly bushes. This one, a tall spikey one with fully green leaves and one with pale green edges instead if yellow. The fully green one is the most robust. It is growing in a shady part of the garden and making even denser shade. The other two are in more open areas. We cut off lower branches to let more light into the lower layers of the garden so summer flowering plants are not completely shaded out. I can’t wait for the spring bulbs to come up, although the local squirrel population seems to like digging them up. There will be narcissi and crocus around the Holly in spring.

Branched

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When you look at trees you can start to recognise what type they are from the shape of their branches.

It looks like they have a regular angle that they branch out at. So if you draw them it’s worth looking closely.

Also be aware if the branches bend downwards, or curve upwards. Some like Ash trees are sometimes said to have witches fingers. The twigs on the branches might stick out at 90° or at more acute or even obtuse angles. Then there is the twistedness of branches, think corkscrew Hazel. Shades of the bark can affect how they look. Water plays a part, either making the bark darker or shiny. When the sun shines the tree can transform, shadows can create tangled patterns.

Always observe if you can….