When will they flower?

My orchids occasionally flower, but they haven’t for ages. The new one I bought still has flowers on it, but the buds soon fell off. I’m trying to feed them but I think I need to get bigger pots for them and new orchid compost/ fibre. I probably don’t water them enough and I don’t spray mist them. But I have had them for years. They have lots of ariel roots, there leaves are mostly green. So I will try and pamper them more.

Growing

I need to start gardening again. I haven’t emptied out the old pots and put in new compost yet. It’s May and I’ve hardly been round the garden. We are trying to save money and so we have delayed making a start. But the perennials in the main garden are growing. The Russian vine is growing like mad after the rain. We have lots of lesser celandine and bluebells coming up, plus wild garlic. Geraniums are getting big enough to flower and the bushes keep growing. Oh so much to do and not enough energy or strength!

.

Daffodils

Yellow and orange. Large flower heds. In front of the house. Cheerful and bright. They delight me when I come home. Signs of spring are showing everywhere now. The trees are starting to blossom, buds are swelling on the branches in my garden. I’ve seen blossom on the trees along the canal. But it’s been dry and sunny, it’s been exceptionally warm for this time in March. I worry because the temperatures are due to fall next week and frost might nip at the buds. But if it stays dry they might be OK. What we need now is rain to swell the buds and start the growth process. Cells expand when they absorb water, the become turgid and then, they start to photosynthesise. We are at the turn of the year.

Spring is springing

Buds are bursting

Leaves are appearing

Pigeons are roosting in the rain

The sky’s are grey

Ducks and geese wander

Round Westport Lake.

A gentle walk

Taking in the view

Dampened by the drizzle

Laceworks of twigs

Fill in the gaps

Soon there will be daffodils

Crocuses and tulips

Then May blossom.

March,

In like a lion

Out like a lamb

(or vice versa)

Soon to be revealed…..

Daphne

I didn’t know what this bush was but it has a lovely scent and was growing in places around the grounds of Rode Hall.

I has to ask one of the gardeners there what it was. She was very helpful in explaining what it was. When I got home I looked it up online: Daphne odora, winter daphne, is a species of flowering plant in the family Thymelaeaceae, native to China, later spread to Japan and Korea. It is an evergreen shrub, grown for its very fragrant, fleshy, pale-pink, tubular flowers, each with four spreading lobes, and for its glossy foliage. Wikipedia

Please note. I’ve been told they are extremely poisonous.

Inside nasturtium plant.

Hubby decided to put a Nasturtium seed in the pot of our Money plant upstairs, (it has round, coin like leaves). It grew, thin and etiolated (tall and thin, reaching for the light). It’s still there this November. It never flowered but maybe I will plant another one next year? I don’t think it will last through the winter, I think Nasturtiums are annual plants, only growing for one year. But it’s an interesting experiment. It would be good if it flowered and trailed down from the upstairs side window. Meanwhile the Money plant needs watering, it’s top heavy and has started pulling over to one side. I do like indoor plants. We have lots of Christmas cactuses. They need watering to get them to flower soon…

Looking back

I didn’t venture out today because its really cold and I’m still a bit unwell. I was scrolling through my photos from the summer and came across this double hanging basket next to the house. It grew and grew and was magnificent in July and August. Now? The frost came last night, a glaze of white on the tiled roof opposite. I think all the baskets will wilt, the delicate annual plants are starting to wither, but the slightly woodier ones like fushias are still there.

Photos of the back to follow, and if I get out into the autumn landscape before all the leaves fall I will post some shots of the trees locally.