Shades of green

IMG_20200122_112207

Today’s challenge on the 64 million artists January challenge on Facebook was to take a journey through your home or garden or to take a walk and collect images of a colour. Because I’ve got a lot of plants and other objects that are green I decided to choose that colour. Including crocheted blanket from my sis, a book on trains, a box for a toy train, a multicolour duster (green section). A late I designed based on clarice cliffs’ pottery, a little sketchbook, Christmas cactus, some plants I’m growing on for spring, ferns and a green bottle, my cat and the garden outside, the border round some photos, finally the ariel roots of my orchid…..

X

Daisy type flowers

DSC_2379_optimized

One of my favourites. The centres of these are a multitude of flowers with petals round the edges (think of sunflower hearts). There are oxeye daisies and osteospermums, cone flowers, asters, all sorts of types and colours. Life in all its variations can be wonderful. This photo is of Rudbeckia I think, taken at Trentham Gardens in the autumn. What I like about daisies is the length of time throughout the year that they flower. They cheer me up.

Have you ever made daisy chains? We used to when we were kids. Pick a daisy and make a hole in the stalk with your fingernail parallel with the stalk, then thread another daisy through till the flower head is in contact with the stem. Then do again till you have a chain. (I’m not suggesting you do this, just how we did it, you shouldn’t pick wildflowers).

Slugs must have some use?

sketch-1579044737001

You know how it is..

You go into the garden

When it rains

And there are slugs.

What are they for?

They munch your broccoli,

Eat the hearts of your lettuce,

Nip the buds off peonies,

And eat your ripe tomatoes.

But they also eat old and diseased vegetables.

They help clear up leaves

In the autumn,

And they are food for blackbirds and frogs.

So not all bad then…?

Sprouts

_20200101_210104

Sprouts to go with this evenings meal. I cut the bases off then cut a cross in the bottom of them. I don’t know if that’s what other people do but it seems to let them cook better. I put them on to boil with water from the kettle for about 15 to 20 minutes. I don’t like them over cooked.

I don’t have them very often. Usually just around Christmas and New Year. They are a seasonal vegetable, a winter crop. Some people think they have too strong a flavour and fry them with bacon. I don’t mind them at all. Definitely one of my five a day.

Holly

DSC_2401_optimized

Variegated Holly, a view of winter plants. When desiduous leaves have fallen, Ivy and Holly add green to the garden. We have three Holly bushes. This one, a tall spikey one with fully green leaves and one with pale green edges instead if yellow. The fully green one is the most robust. It is growing in a shady part of the garden and making even denser shade. The other two are in more open areas. We cut off lower branches to let more light into the lower layers of the garden so summer flowering plants are not completely shaded out. I can’t wait for the spring bulbs to come up, although the local squirrel population seems to like digging them up. There will be narcissi and crocus around the Holly in spring.

Christmas Cactii

Watching the flowers bloom on my kitchen window ledge. One Christmas cactus has flowered abd faded. One is in full bloom and the third isĀ  just coming into flower. I also have one which has tiny buds on it. It’s interesting how they have flowered in progression. I don’t know if some have had more water than others. But they must be healthy. Easy to look after. I put a bit that broke off in a mug of water and it has now grown roots.

Green view

IMG_20190303_152420

Cold, wet and windy, but still a bit green where the ivy is growing up trees in the garden. Really it needs cutting back. I don’t want it strangling them. There are bird feeders out there, but there seem to be less birds than normal. Perhaps they have enough food, we haven’t seen evidence of them being predated by cats thankfully. I want to get out there and cut back the buddliea bushes. They need pruning.

The pond is OK, it’s hidden below the cherry tree. It has only frozen a couple of times and only thinly this autumn / winter. We hope to have tadpoles in the spring.