Green Mars

I was reading a fellow bloggers post about a book that describes the complexity of the middle ages and how peoples freedom was affected by their ability to sell goods locally. I’m afraid I am struggling to understand the explanations.

It led me to think about a book I’m currently reading called Green Mars. It is the second of a trilogy about terraforming Mars by Kim Stanley Garner. The ideas in the second book Green Mars go into a lot of details about transnational companies becoming the defacto rulers of Mars. The population of earth are split between the rich who have had gerantological treatments and the poor who only have slight access to them. It’s amazing how thought through the future civilisation is. But it’s densely argued, even with a well plotted history including a brief third world war.

I’m only half way through the book, having read the first book in the trilogy, Red Mars, a few years ago. It’s my second attempt to read it. I’d read the first chapter during lock down but couldn’t get into the book. I think it’s worth reading if you don’t want rip roaring sci-fi, but a densely imagined history of the characters that use their scientific knowledge to terraform the planet. Reading about varieties of variously genetically enhanced people plants and lichens is fascinating if you have the inclination to read it.

I have Blue Mars on the bookshelves somewhere, I might try and read it one day.

Sixty years

There is an anniversary this year, the sixtieth year of Dr Who. I can remember hiding behind the settee when I was a child when I saw the monsters on TV in the programme. Not only Daleks were frightening. Cybermen and Autons too. The Doctor would always be caught in a cliffhanger situation at the end of an episode. In the next one he would solve the problem and rescue people on the planets he had landed on. In those days stories lasted four or five weeks. After a hiatus of a few years when the series seemed to have stopped for good it came back in the form of a film starring Paul McGann. Followed by a resurrected Christopher Eccleston in a brand new series. I know they are planning a spectacular story for the sixtieth story. I hope it lives up to expectations. I’m still a fan.

Dalek

Hubby grabbed the Dalek arm so it could not shoot at me. Well not really. This character from the Sci-fi series ‘Dr Who’ was on display in the foyer of the Potteries Museum and Art gallery so of course I had to take a photo. The TV series has been on and off the BBC over about fifty years! It’s amazing how the show has such longevity, but then it could be because the ‘doctor’ of the title can regenerate and turn into a new person. In the meantime ii hope it doesn’t say ‘Exterminate!’.

Treeish

Mirrored photo from a couple of years ago. I think it looks quite alien. Like a three fingered monolith supporting a world floating above. Maybe a green environment in a space ship. Life held in stasis while the ship ploughs through space, ready to colonise a new planet.

I do like thinking odd thoughts. I clearly am interested in sci-fi. Breath of fresh air, green and powerful.

Moon closer?

There’s a new film out about the Moon getting a lot closer to the Earth. Its by the same director as ‘Independence day’ and ‘the day after tomorrow’ I think?

There is also a video on Instagram showing the Moon closer and instead of being tidaly locked with the Earth (one face always towards us), it’s shown wobbling irregularly.

Thinking about it I wondered what would happen. Unless it was hit by something very large it wouldn’t move closer to us. But if it did I think we would have massive tides and earthquakes. The land rises as the moon passes over it. The question is how close does the video or film represent? The closer, the worse the effects. I know the moon is slowly moving away by a few centimeters a year, its been measured with a laser fired at mirrors left on its surface by the Apollo missions. If it was knocked away the Earth’s tilt would become worse and our spin unstable. Either way not good news…

Alien plant?

Not a Triffid, more mobile and intelligent. The plants are spreading. Faster than a bird in flight. Trapping creatures and absorbing them. Think intelligent pitcher plant. The larger they grow the bigger their prey. Human victims have been caught out in the open, trapped in cars, trains and buses. Now the plants are surrounding our homes. Green walls with sinister intentions.

Against it? Nothing at the moment. Television and satellite signals have been cut. All countries are separate. Where the climate is warming the aliens grow faster. Only in the far north and south are possibilities of a fight back. Who will survive?

Star

The star was surrounded by a crystalline structure. Stems branching out towards other stars…. Light rushed down one arm from its tip to a place inside the structure. A figure emerged from within the glowing light.

How are you Doctor? the man said. How have you been? I’m fine he said. Just passing through. Looking for a large blue box…. You haven’t seen it have you? It’s made of wood and has windows and a door. I lost it somewhere in Alpha Centauri.

Oh, the Tardis? Yes it’s stored here. I can release it into your hands…..The Doctor smiled, but then looked quizzically at his friend…. Yes said the man, er, its complicated, it was the reverse polarity when it came through the quantum flux. Its over there.

The Doctor stared, there in a small crystalline cupboard sat the Tardis, six centimeters tall. Real, but tiny……

Now what do I do? Said the Doctor.

Well done Captain Kirk!

The drawing of Captain Kirk I did years ago. Now William Shatner, who played him in the Star Trek sci-fi series in the 1960’s, has flown up in a rocket and reached the edge of space.

60 miles up, a ten minute flight. But he’s 90 years old and he has done it! The oldest person/ actor/ sci-fi star to hitch a ride above the Earth. Well done x