Dog work in progress.

He’s almost done, looks like a Teddy bear so it needs some more attention.

I am struggling with the fur, trying to soften it, it looks too spiky at the moment. I need to get the ears right and his belly sorted out. The photo I’m working from has him in a dogs rain cover or coat, but that is covering areas I need to paint. Three hours of work and I feel like I’m only shuffling forwards. But I’ll get there.

Dog, work in progress

Acrylic on canvas, a few more layers. The rough edges of his coat, where they touch the grass, need sorting out. The dig has got a silver coat and a collar and lead on which I’ve left out so I’m trying to decide where the shadows should fall and his fur. I think I’ve made some of it too yellow, I need daylight to check.

Work in progress

So while I forgot to enter the open art exhibition I did at least work on this portrait of a dog. I’ve decided to paint it sitting on a lawn. The original photo had it sitting on a bright blue blanket which in turn sat on a block paving path. I hope it’s owner will like it when I’ve done it.l

Lots of details to add. I need to get the fur shading and colours right, and the thickness of the fur right. The same with the blades of grass. A few more hours work needed.

What’s in a name..?

Leonhard Seppala

Image from Wikipedia, I hope I am not infringing copyright.

A name popped up on TV today, an unusual surname, but one I know because I have a friend who has that name.

Have you heard of Leonhard Seppala (spelt with an h). He was part of several sled teams in 1925 that got serum to Nome in Alaska to save people from diphtheria. He went 261 miles in a snow storm to help get the serum to them. The dog sleders efforts was commemorated by the Iditorod annual dog sled race.

I hope he is related to my friend. I think Seppala is a Scandinavian name? It will be interesting to find out.

Archaeological dog walking?

Not with those soles!

This was a patch of concrete or cement on the pavement next to a telecommunications box. Maybe someone in forensics could date these soles, their size, the weight of the person? The dog print looks like it’s a large dog, big claws on it. And the crack, did that happen because there are tree roots below it? Why stand on this? I wonder if it was deliberate.

Ginger

For a couple of years now I’ve sponsored a guide dog for the blind. I get regular ‘pupdates’ to tell me how the trainee puppy is doing. Ginger is my latest puppy and when I saw this photo I just had to share. The thought that this cute dog can turn into a kind helper to a person in need is so wonderful. I hope Ginger learns well and qualifies with flying colours.

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Gargoyle

Or some sort of stone carving. Whatever he is, he’s a bit frightening!

Seen in Cherished Chimneys in Longport he was staring out from among the chimney pots and pottery. I had to take a photo as he was so cute (for an angry dog!). I was impressed by the carving of the chain round his neck and his huge canine teeth. I guess he is a piece of architectural salvage, though I’m not sure which building he would have come from. Or maybe he was on a gatepost at a large country house? I suppose Britain’s heritage means we have a lot of things like this from when buildings are torn down. A lot of old houses have been demolished, fallen into ruin, or just been abandoned over the centuries. Their loss is our gain.