Bull?

Stained glass window in Burslem School of art. Its on the stairs, halfway up between the main floor and the upper floor. It has a history, but again I was in a rush and didn’t get the details. But it was created by the head of art there and his students. Its mainly painted on the glass and does not have a lot of lead segments like church windows. I think it’s beautiful and poignant, and a great memory to cherish.

Wall painting

Wall in Burslem painted with the Burleigh ware pattern that is available on pottery from Middleport pottery just down the road. There was a board below it which explained more but I was in a rush so just took a photo and then had to go. This is visible outside Burslem School of Art on the wall to the right of the front doors. As you probably know I love pattern so this is right up my street. Also this colour of blue is fabulous although the pieces I own are dark red and white.

Balsa Wood models

I went up to Burslem School of Art today and after looking around downstairs we went and had a look at the first floor. There was a lot of work by a local school. There were also these train engine models that had been made of balsa wood.

I don’t know their history but one has a named City of Stoke-on-Trent. If my hubby has been there he would have known what type of engine it was and who originally made it. He’s very good at recognising them.

They played jazz

At the three counties open. There was a small group of musicians playing gentle music. I think it was jazz. They were in a corner, just taking up a small space by one of the doors. Three hundred or so people milled past them, looking at pictures, photos, paintings. The band played on. I don’t think any of them were hit by out flung elbows, but it was a lucky escape! As the evening progressed more people arrived. The ‘one glass of wine’ policy seemed to be relaxed. Two hundred and more unmasked people mingled and breathed on each other… And I felt worried and anxious. I’d forgotten to take a mask. I was like a baby taking my first steps… Very nervous.

At the exhibition

Me with my coast painting at the three counties open. It’s got a red dot ( not on the photo) because it’s sold. I have to day I felt privileged to be amongst such talented artists. There were around 100 pieces of art and maybe 300 people? It was very hot, humid and crowded. We stayed till the speeches were over but then I had to get out.. I felt overwhelmed and claustrophobic. I was ready to run! At one stage a wasp came in the window and I almost knocked a man over trying to dance out of its way! Pirouetting with a glass of wine in one hand and flapping uselessly with the other. I wish I’d worn a mask. Nice to see old friends but after just over an hour we escaped…

On the easle today

Another in the textured landscapes series I’m creating. After getting the first painting accepted into the three counties open exhibition in Burslem School of art, I now have the opportunity to put some paintings up for sale at the Etruria Industrial Museum cafe. I decided to try and use a similar style to create colourful and striking landscapes. I’m using a different size of pattern, smaller than the Waterfall painting and more intricate. I want to evoke wild flowers in a summer landscape with Westport Lake in the distance.

Handing in day.

The day is coming when I have to take my painting ‘coast’ into the Burslem School of Art so that it can be hung for the three counties open. I hope it will be OK and be displayed in a good place.

I’m thinking of doing a series of these paintings in this style. I might do some images based on the pottery factories in this city. Stoke-on-Trent is known as the ‘Potteries’ and it might be good to celibate its history. I will see.

Three counties open

I’m very pleased to say I have had my painting ‘coast’ accepted in the three counties open exhibition in Burslem School of art later this year.

Burslem School of Art is famous for teaching artists their skills in the early twentieth century. I think Clarice Cliff was one of their students. I know the artist Arthur Berry studied there before becoming famous as the potteries ‘Lowry’.

It’s great that a physical exhibition will actually be held this year. I hope many people will be able to come and see it.

Collapsing hotel

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This poor wrecked old hotel sits forlorn opposite the Burslem school of art. There is also the wedgewood institute built directly opposite the school, but that’s had work done on it to restore it.

It’s good that a few buildings are being preserved, but the old hotel is interesting with its turrets and bay windows. Is it too far gone? Possibly, the roof partly collapsed last week and the road was cordoned off by the police and fire brigade last week. Now wooden boards form a wall round it and it’s ground floor windows, which had been shops, look sad and run down.

Burslem is the mother town, the oldest of the six pottery towns. Its sad to see its magnificent architecture in such decline.

Burslem is all on a slant, I think it’s suffering a lot if subsidence due to either a fault line or mining. A lot of buildings seem to be affected by this. I wonder if anything will be done about it?