Stars

Green stars abstract. Using a photo of an illuminated star. Duplicating it then changing the textures. The resulting image is a colourful abstract with an antique feel to it.

Pattern again, I like repeating images and tessellations. Must be the way my mind works… I like to learn and play with things till they look good. X

Antiques are green!

A old wooden cupboard, but much greener than a modern one. Probably manufactured without much machinery. Transported to a shop on a horse and cart. The wood its made of must be 100 years old. It isn’t damaging rain forests now. Apparently an old chest of draws has a 16X smaller carbon footprint than its modern equivalent.

By buying old furniture which has stood the test of time you are recycling something that still had a use. I suppose if you don’t like brown furniture you could upcycle it… But that cupboard might just be worth something, so don’t sand it down and paint it if you aren’t sure of its provinance.

Old glass lampshade

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Saw this in the pub a few days ago. I’m not sure if it’s antique or a reproduction but it has a feeling of something from the start of the last century. I liked the main shade surrounded by three smaller shades all held together by solid but delicately shaped metal. I wonder if it’s converted from a gas mantle?

I imaging its a considerable weight, so I guess it’s screwed into a ceiling joist. I didn’t think to look at the lights in the rest of the pub so I don’t know if it’s the only one there. Perhaps it’s from a reclamation yard? There are a few round here. Anyway it’s good to see old things about.

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Looking at backstamps

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What are back stamps??

They are the trademark or manufacturers markĀ  that you find on the bottom of cups, plates and dishes that shows who made them.

This can be useful in identifying the manufacturer, whether they are antique and if they are worth anything. Sometimes they even get forged! People have added things like the Clarice Cliff signature onto modern pots to try and fool people into buying them as originals.

Some pots have simple marks on their base to identify them. Others have complicated patterns and writing.

The people who live in the potteries (Stoke-on-Trent). Have a habit of looking underneath pots to see if they have recognised which pottery made them. I think it’s called the “turn over club” but I may be wrong…..