Anderton Boat Lift

_20200115_003550The Anderton Boat lift is somewhere I would like to visit. Its near the village of Anderton, in Cheshire, England. It is fifty foot high and joins the Trent and Mersey canal to the river Weaver. Boats go from theĀ  canal or river into a lift filled with water and the boat and water is either lowered or raised to the other one. It’s called a two caisson lift lock, although I’m not sure why it’s called that.

The lift is a scheduled monument, and was built in 1875. It was closed in 1983 because of corrosion, but luckily it was restored in 2001and reopened in 2002. We intend to visit later in the year, there is a visitor centre run by the Canal and River Trust. I’ve checked and it is open at the weekend.

Dust Rising 19

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Dust rising (or Dust 19) is a group show by artists being held at Spode alongside the British ceramic biennial which is currently on till mid October.

This is me with one of the plates that have been created out of transfer prints. (if you look over my left shoulder the green patterns on the window are where the image comes from).

It’s amazing what’s going on here. We might be a bit down in the dumps but Stoke-on-Trent is so full of creativity. There is still a full time Fine Art course at Staffordshire University which is quite unusual in the current economic climate.

Stoke-on-Trent is situated in the middle of beautiful countryside. You can’t complain if you want places to visit.

So I guess what I’m saying is come visit!

Llandudno Tram

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We decided to go up the Great Orme on the tram. There is a tram station at the bottom of the mountain (reached by a steepish road) one half way up and a final one near the top of the Great Orme. You transfer from one tram to another at the halfway point or you can walk up if you feel fit. There is also a chair lift which runs from near the toll road at the base of the mountain to the top. The carriages for this are quite high up in the air. I was a bit to nervous to ride on it!

 

These photos are from the bottom half of the ride. As you can see the track is a single line hauled up and down on a cable embedded in the road, but there are passing places with two lines where the trams pass. They run about every twenty minutes, although when you are in a large queue you may have to wait a while longer.

The halfway station is quite large, you can see some of the workings and tools of the trade. There are also display boards with information about the teams. If you walk down slightly from halfway there are Roman copper mines that you can explore.

 

Whan you reach the top tram Station you are greeted by a statue of a magnificent mountain goat. There is also a visitor centre with a piece of land with wild flowers growing there. The top of the Orme has a trig point which has a stone to line up with other prominent points on the map. There is also a restaurant, cafe and bar with other attractions at the top. There are paths all over the mountain, and as well as the access road that you can use following the team line there is also a steep and winding road up from the toll road side of the Orme.

If you go to Llandudno for a visit and you fancy a gentle adventure try going up the Orme.

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