Crumpets

‘and shall we have crumpets for tea ?’

I don’t remember where that quote comes from. But that’s what we had for our meal this afternoon. Toasted to a slightly brown colour and hot so that the crumpet is cooked through. I usually have butter or margarine on it but today I had butter and then as a treat a small amount of Greek honey.

The porous, sponge like consistency of the crumpet makes it good for absorbing melted butter. The top of a crumpet is full of a lattice of holes, whereas the base is solid, so these lacunae stay filled and only leak slightly. Yummy! I’ve also toasted crumpets, then grated cheese on them and then I gently microwave them for a savoury snack.

This bought back a memory of using a fork pierced through a crumpet and pushed onto the front bars of a gas fire. A tricky thing to do as the fire might burn your fingers as well as the crumpet! Cook the back first then the front, then take it off the fire and butter and eat. (Childhood memories of when life was more basic).

Tortilla pockets with quorn mince.

Serves two.

Ingredients

Fajhita seasoning, four tortilla pouches, small packet of quorn mince, a small onion, a few spears of asparagus, a few baby corn, half a jar of harissa paste, a small amount of cheese (you could use a vegan substitute) olive oil. Salsa sauce.

Method, break up the frozen quorn mince and fry in a frying pan with a small amount of olive oil, slice the baby corn into small rounds, keep the heat low, add the fajhita spice and continue to cook. Slice up the onion and add to the mix, then chop up the asparagus and add it to the mix. Add some water to the pan to stop the mixture drying out. Add the harissa paste and stir well. Let the mixture simmer for ten minutes. Add the salsa sauce (or if you want to add at the end). Microwave a couple of tortilla pockets then spoon the mix into them. Top with grated cheese. Any left over mixture can be served with the pockets on the plates.

Serve as a tasty meal for two…

Biscuit

Biscuit and coffee, biscuit and tea. Biscuit with cheese. So many accompaniments. It’s good to enjoy them with something. To dunk or not? I like dunking. Dunking and drinking. Bits of biscuit get too soft and drop off in lumps into your drink.

Biscuits go with desserts as well. You can soak them in alcohol and use them in the bases of cheesecake smashed up with butter to make a hard layer for the topping. Tasty.

Sketching breakfast

If you don’t eat meat, look away now….

 

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If you can’t see what it is, I drew bacon about to be grilled, so I could make bacon and cheese oatcakes.

Today’s USK S-O-T challenge was to draw ‘cooking’. Various pots and pans and foodstuffs have been drawn. It’s keeping me occupied and mentally active.

USK stands for Urban Sketchers, its a world wide movement of people who draw their environment. The rules are, draw from life, not a photo, include background, not just the subject on its own. There are others but I can’t remember them all…. Anyway, I wonder what tomorrows challenge will be. X

Cheese please?

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Firstly, there are two of us, me and my hubby, middle aged, we need to lose weight, not eat as much food.

But hubby went shopping today, shopping for fruit? Yes, mince pies? Yes.

A two pound block of cheddar… A TWO POUND BLOCK OF CHEDDAR? Why? I need to cut my cholesterol, not raise it and apart from cheese on toast and cheese sandwiches, or a bit grated onto pasta, where can we use so much? Answer, hubby will chop it up and eat it in chunks. Any suggestions? Cheese and curry, fish and cheese?

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Cheese (chayse) Oatcakes (owtcayks)

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Fast, old fashioned food.

The Staffordshire oatcake (words in brackets are my attempt to write it in a Stoke dialect).

Oatcakes in Staffordshire are thin, lace like and tasty. Unrolled they fit on a small dinner plate. They can be eaten with various fillings including savory ones like cheese, cheese and bacon, cheese and sausage (I feel a theme developing). Or you can have them sweet with jam or marmalade which is probably unacceptable to traditionalists. Oatcakes are food or ‘snappin’ to be eaten for breakfast with a strong cup of tea. They are tasty and if you are lucky to have an oatcake shop nearby they are delicious hot from the griddle.

They are an inexpensive meal and can be filled with your own fillings, perhaps chilli con carne or crispy duck? I guess you could even cook them with stewed apple and cream.

I cooked mine in the microwave rolled with grated cheese and added brown sauce. If you grill them you are better heating them flat to make them hot and crispy. Then sprinkle your filling all over like on toast so that the edges don’t burn. They can then be folded in half and finished under the grill. You can eat them with a salad garnish or coleslaw.

You never know you might enjoy them.

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