Two more miles

After walking five miles this afternoon my hubby suggested we took a short walk this evening as it was still warm and the sun was bright even though it was going down. We walked past an old school with wavy railings. It is in the process of being knocked down. Then as my hubby walked away from me I stopped and caught a shot of him striding into the sunset (by then my feet were hurting). But that was another two miles so I did just over seven in total. Its the furthest I have walked for a couple of months. I must do more!

Sun and Moon

#30daysketchbookchallenge, Day 23 drawing. Sun and Moon in an eclipse. I couldn’t get the black dark enough and the colours bright enough so I used Instagram filters on it….

I’ve seen a couple of eclipses in the UK. They were only partial eclipses but by looking in a bowl of water, and also the dark reflective paint on my car I managed to see something. Also the phenomenon of curved moon shapes of light caused by light from the partially eclipsed sun shining through vegitation.

NEVER LOOK AT THE SUN DIRECTLY EVEN IN AN ECLIPSE. IF YOU ARE USING FILTER GLASSES MAKE SURE THEY ARE NOT FAKE. IF YOU LOOK DIRECTLY AT THE SUN YOU CAN BE BLINDED!

Sunset getting later

At the start of January it was getting dark around 4.40pm and we were having about eight hours of light. Now it’s staying light till after five. I feel like a weight is lifting slightly. Like the edges of a blanket being pulled up and light seeping in around the edges.

The clouds have obscured the sunset for the last few days. We’ve had almost a months rain in a day in some places in the UK with storm Christoph causing flooding in Wales and Northern England. We have avoided the worst here, but twenty miles or so away the town of Northwich in Cheshire is flooded in places and the river Severn is close to flooding over.

fire in the sky!

See that shining light? Thats the Sun, so bright.

Reflected shadows and bright highlights, a firy beacon beyond the horizon. It rose eight minutes ago. But light is not infinitley fast, and so it takes that time to travel the 93 million miles or so to get here. If you could hear the Sun sizzle the sound would take hours or even days, as the speed of sound is far slower ( thats why lightening always flashes first and then the rumble follows). But sound doesnt travel through a vaccuum. I get so irritated with Sci-fi films. Outside in space- no one can hear you scream… you need an atmosphere to hear, as molecules bump into other molecules and sound propagates…. soundwaves make your eardrums vibrate and tiny bones send that movement to your brain…

Sizzle on Sun, silently….

Sunlight

Sunlight streaming through the window Shines on Christmas cards and books, ornaments my sewing kit. As the sun rises it also travels south in the sky in winter. Then in the afternoon it appears to move downwards and West. So because of the way the earth is tipped on its axis the position on the sky moves in arcs that tip further south in the winter and further north in summer. So the sun appears overhead eventually.

If the Earth was rotating on a vertical axis at 90° to the plane of the solar system, then day length would stay the same all over the world. 12 hours day and 12 hours night. There would be no seasons. There would probably be no poles as all parts of the earth would receive the same amount of heat from the sun.

Instead the tip of the axis means that the day length changes over the years. So at the solstices the earth has turned to have its poles either closest or furthest apart from the sun. It’s also complicated by the earth travelling in an elliptical orbit round the sun. In the summer in the North of the world the sun is actually slightly further away from the earth than in the winter.

Anyway enough of celestial mechanics. Don’t get me started on the moon! Happy Boxing day. X

Sunny for a while

Light at this time of year is always low. Striking across the ground rather than high above it. This is because the Earths Northern hemisphere tips away from the Sun. So much so that the North Pole dips into darkness in the winter months. Shadows are long now and when you do get into sunshine the light can be blinding from the Sun on the horizon. You can look for images of the suns track across the sky at different times of the year. It basically arcs round from East to West but tipped at an angle dipping more South as winter progresses, then from the winter solstice around the 21st of December, it starts to slowly work its way back up the sky until its almost overhead on Midsummer day at midday, then the cycle starts all over again.

Spectrum

White light

Split into colours

Created by sunlight

Rainbows glow

Chemicals create different colours, sodium used in street lights glows yellow. Chemicals are used in fireworks, like strontium (red?) or copper green, creating different colours, blues, purples, oranges.

The reason sunlight is made up of a spectrum is because the sun is made not only of hydrogen and helium but all the chemicals in the periodic table up to iron (any chemicals beyond that can only be created in Super Novae explosions). All the chemicals in the sun glow in different colours, which is why they show up when the white light from the sun passed through a prism. If you split the spectrum further you can find dark lines, these are markers of which chemicals are present. The older the star the more chemicals. As a star gets older it starts to burn up its hydrogen and helium. New chemicals are created by atoms fusing together. That’s where new chemicals are made. When you think about it, if it wasn’t for stars burning or exploding we couldn’t exist.