Why have I got so much cutlery?

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And one chopstick?

I had a nice set of six of each stainless steel cutlery, that was fine. But they started disappearing, what was going on? I guessed my hubby had taken them. He’s into fixing bicycles…. Hmm.

So I went and bought some nice ones with blue handles. But over the years the metal on them started to wear away. They were going rusty!

I don’t buy new things very often but after a few years I decided to buy a new set, lovely, sleek, stainless steel. Nice.

So that’s why I’ve got so much. Mostly we use the new ones, and the first stainless steel set, and then the blue handled ones…. Er yes, I know, I should keep washing the same ones. Maybe it saves hot water?

The one chopstick? Found the other one in the bathroom, propping up a maiden hair fern.

And the old cutlery that’s missing? Well I was looking in the shed for something and found some rusty knives and a fork in his tool box. He’s been using them as tyre levers, to fix punctures.

Shed arrival

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This morning a shed and summerhouse we ordered arrived. I got them because they were ex display models so they cost half the price they should have. DSC_1291_optimized

I’m not sure why I wanted a summer house as well. I have this idea that I’m going to sit out in the garden in the summer and use it to paint in.

The builder is putting them up at the moment. We have also had some fencing put up because the back of the garden was getting so overgrown it had pulled the bit of fencing down that had been there for years. We intend to plant clematis and honeysuckle against it.

That’s about all I’m going to say about it. It’s a big cost. But if it means we can store and save all my husbands collection of old bicycles and stop them from rusting it’s a good idea.

More from the north west

After our first night at Morecambe we could not resist a drive up to South Lakeland. Part of the Lake district. It only took a short while to get there.

The first place we visited was the lakeland motor museum. Situated near Haverthwaite in the south part of the Lake district, the museum is just off  the main road. There is a large selection of motor cars, from the oldest cars and getting younger as you wind your way through the collection. Interspersed with shop window fronts full of museum exhibits, the cars are very interesting. I decided to draw part of a blue Bentley that was owned by Donald Campbell. He lost his life trying to beat the water speed record on Coniston lake. The colour of the car is not authentic because the car was restored in the past. However it was a beautiful example of the workmanship of car makers. There are also bicycles and planes on display in the museum.

Then it’s a few meters down the road to the Lakeside and Haverthwaite railway. I sat and drew the bridge over the train tracks while we waited for the steam train to arrive. The train was pulled by an engine called Repulse. I’m not sure but I think it was a Bagnall engine. They also have the only two Fairburn steam engines still in existence. (The rest were broken up by British rail when diesels were introduced to the railways).

We took the train up to Lakeside and then travelled on the Tern, an old converted steam ship which is now powered by a diesel engine. Tern took us to Bowness about half way up the Lake. The mist and rain was falling off the hills and from the sky. After several weeks of summer heat it was actually quite pleasant to feel the cool damp air. We did not have time to carry on up to the top of the lake to Ambleside because we were running out of time. So a short break at a Lakeside cafe and we came back on another, smaller boat. Back to the train and back to our starting point at Haverthwaite station.

Back in time for a quiet meal in a Chinese restaurant in Morecambe……